Trying to predict the peak of fall color year to year is a challenge since much depends on the weather and the microclimate around each tree. Fortunately, Georgia’s variety of tree species ensures you can count on a show of fall colors each year.

Visit our Fall Leaf Watch page, the Georgia State Parks website, and the links listed below for Leaf Watch reports, photo galleries, and more.

GFC Leaf Watch Reports

TitleDescriptionDocument Type
10-13-21 Leaf Watch Report

Lowering temperatures and adequate rainfall has led to the beginning of foliage color change in NW GA.

Page on GFC Website
10/7/21 Leaf Watch Report

Cooler nights, sunny days, and adequate rainfall are signaling the beginning of the fall foliage season. Trees are on track to display vivid changes in color over the next four weeks.

Page on GFC Website

Leaf Watch Report Archives

Resources and Publications

TitleDescriptionDocument Type
Don’t Move Firewood

Georgia Forestry Commission Forest Health experts say moving firewood has been linked to the spread of destructive, non-native insects and diseases to forest ecosystems. While these pests can’t move far on their own, they can travel hundreds of miles when people move firewood, logs, chips, and mulch. Forest pests can kill our native trees and be very expensive, if not impossible, to control.

PDF
Autumn Leaves Flyer

Shorter days and cooler nights start a precise clockwork of physical and chemical interactions within leaf cells bringing forests ablaze with color as they prepare for winter dormancy. In response to certain environmental stimuli, leaf pigments begin to reveal themselves in the leaves of Georgia’s deciduous trees. The amount of pigments in trees depends on the tree species, soil composition, and other environmental components.

PDF
NTG Fall Color Supplement

These are generally considered the fall colors during peak season. Habitat, weather, genetics, and other components can give variations to the general. Nature determines fall color, not exact science.

PDF
Native Trees of Georgia

Georgia’s forests are home to approximately 250 species of trees. Native Trees of Georgia describes 92 of them.

PDF
Fall Coloring Activity Sheet

Learn about why leaves change color in the fall through this coloring activity sheet.

PDF
Learn about Fall Foliage

Learn about how leaves change colors in the fall with Chelsea York, our Conservation Education Coordinator.

Video

Partnering Links

TitleDescriptionDocument Type
Explore Georgia

Official Georgia Tourism and Travel Site

External Website
Fall Color

Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest in Georgia

External Website
Brasstown Bald Webcams

Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest in Georgia

External Website
Leaf Coloring Pages

US Forest Service

External Website
The Science of Color in Autumn Leaves

US National Arboretum

External Website
Fall Color Pictures

Virginia Tech

External Website